Department of Religious Studies

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Spring 2017

For the entire Religious Studies course catalog, and full course description please see http://bulletin.case.edu/collegeofartsandsciences/religiousstudies/#courseinventory

RLGN 151- Introducing African Religions- Joy R. Bostic (T.R. 1:00-2:15)

This course offers an introduction to the academic study of African Religions. Whether approached through a particular theme or as a general historical introduction, each section of this course provides students with a general introduction to the academic study of religion and basic religious literacy in African and African-derived religions in the Caribbean, Europe, and the Americas and thus will explore forms of these traditions in a diversity of cultural contexts

RLGN 154- Introducing Hinduism- Deepak Sarma (T.R. 11:30-12:45)

This course offers an introduction to the academic study of Hinduism. Whether approached through a particular theme or as a general historical introduction, each section of this course provides students with a general introduction to the academic study of religion and basic religious literacy in Hinduism, exploring forms of it in a diversity of cultural contexts.

RLGN 171- Introducing Christianity– Jonathan Tan (T.R. 10:00-11:15)

This course offers an introduction to the academic study of Christianity. Whether approached through a particular theme or as a general historical introduction, each section of this course provides students with a general introduction to the academic study of religion and a basic religious literacy in Christianity, exploring forms of it in a diversity of cultural contexts throughout the world

RLGN 201: Interpreting Religion: Approaches and Current Issues – Timothy K. Beal (Tu 4:00-6:30)

Introduction to academic study of religion, exploring the history and development of the field, important theories and methodologies, and current issues, debates, and horizons of research.

RLGN 209- Introduction to Biblical Literature- Timothy K. Beal (W 3:20-5:50)

This course is an introduction to the academic study of biblical literature, including Hebrew Scriptures (“Old Testament”) and the New Testament. The literature will be studied in light of both ancient and contemporary historical contexts, with a particular emphasis on the roles it plays in American culture and politics today.

RLGN 221: Indian Philosophy– Deepak Sarma (T.R.  1:00-2:15)

(Also offered as PHIL 221) We will survey the origins of Indian philosophical thought, with an emphasis on early Buddhist, Hindu and Jain literature. Our concern will be the methods, presuppositions, arguments, and goals of these schools and trajectories of thought.

RLGN 227: Women, Gender, and Islam– Justine Howe (T.R. 2:30-3:45)

(Also offered as WGST 227) This course examines the position of women and gender in the foundational Islamic texts, the Qur’an and Sunna (the practice of the Prophet Muhammad), and pre-modern interpretations of them.

RLGN 254: The Holocaust: Historical Perspective– Jay Geller (T.R. 2:30-3:45)

(Also offered as HSTY 254, JDST 254 and ETHS 254) This class seeks to answer fundamental questions about the Holocaust: the German-led organized mass murder of nearly six million Jews and millions of other ethnic and religious minorities.  It will investigate the origins and development of racism in modern European society, the manifestations of that racism, and responses to persecution.

 RLGN 260: Introduction to the Qur’an- Justine Howe (T.R. 11:30-12:45)

This course is an introduction to the Qur’an. It introduces students to the text of the Qur’an, in English translation, providing a window into both Muslim interpretations of their scripture (from the early days of Islam to the present) and academic studies of the text.

RLGN 302/402: The Lemonade Class: Religion, Race, Sex and Black MusicJoy R. Bostic (W 4:25-6:55)

Charles Long suggests that black musical forms are creative responses to the particular circumstances of black peoples’ presence in the U.S and black notions of the sacred. In April of 2016, Beyoncé released her visual album Lemonade two days after the death of Prince. This course is organized around the album’s title cuts and links these two artists together in an examination of religion and musical performance as creative response to the racial and gendered conditions of black life. The course investigates how both artists have used music as a platform to explore issues of race, gender, commerce, sexuality, power and divinity. The course also looks at examples from the works of earlier artists who address similar themes such as Ma Rainey, Bessie Smith, Muddy Waters, Billie Holiday, Nina Simone, Little Richard, James Brown, Marvin Gaye, and Aretha Franklin.

RLGN 310/410: Cognitive Science of Religion- William Deal (M.W. 12:45-2:00)

(Also offered as COGS 310/410)  This course introduces theories and methods in the cognitive science of religion.  Particular emphasis is placed on applying cognitive scientific concepts and theories to such religious issues as belief in deities, religious ritual, and morality.

RLGN 312: The Mythical Trickster- Judith Neulander (T.R. 10:00-11:15)

Few literary figures have as wide a distribution, and as long a history, as the mythical Trickster. Using folkloristic theories and ethnographic methods, we will come to understand the social functions and symbolic meanings of the cross-cultural Trickster, over time and across space.

RLGN 314: Mythologies of the Afterlife- Judith Neulander (T.R. 1:00-2:15)

(Also offered as JDST 314) This course provides a multidisciplinary approach to the idea of an afterlife, and its manifestation in diverse cultures.  We will examine the way varying views of the afterlife influence religion, popular culture and palliative care, and how human creativity has shaped the heavens, hells, hauntings and holidays of diverse populations over time and across space.

RLGN 316/416: Christianity in China- Jonathan Tan (Th 4:00-6:30)

(Also offered as HSTY 322, CHIN 316 and ETHS 326) This course critically evaluates Christianity’s long history in China. Students will critically discuss and analyze the historical dimensions of Christianity’s presence in China and engagement with various social, cultural, political, philosophical, and religious aspects of Chinese society, past and present, and consider the implications of emergent forms of contemporary indigenous Chinese Christian movements for the future of Chinese Christianity.

Page last modified: November 16, 2016